NOAA Weather Radio in Collier County



NOAA Weather Radio console in Miami, origination point for WWG-92
WWG-92
is now 
On the Air!

162.525 MHz

Map of Florida NWR Coverage

Midland radio10/20/99 - Midland SAME weather radios recalled


Collier County EM Home Page || NOAA Weather Radio Home Page

Collier NWR Dedication Ceremony || Collier County NWR pictures

Retuning your NOAA Weather Radio to receive the Collier County signal

NOAA Weather Radio Vendors || NWR FAQ
 
 

NOAA Weather Radio Brochure (.pdf for Adobe Acrobat Reader)


Mark Trail image courtesy of North American Syndicate, Inc., World Rights Reserved
(Image from NWS Site)
UPDATE: (July 27, 2000) 

       At 11:30 AM on December 11, 1998 Collier County's NOAA Weather Radio transmitter was dedicated in a ceremony including the Board of County Commissioners, the National Weather Service, the State of Florida and WAVV radio.  WWG-92 is now in full service, providing the latest forecasts and observations for southwest Florida, as well as special watches and warnings issued by the National Weather Service forecast office in Miami.  This transmitter serves Collier, Hendry and mainland Monroe counties, as well as the adjacent coastal waters.

       (Lee County residents should continue to use WXK-83 in Ft. Myers as their primary source of NOAA Weather Radio information.  The Lee County frequency remains 162.475 mhz, and the Lee County SAME code is 0 1 2 0 7 1.)

      The vendor, Crown Broadcast International, installed the final transmitter in late June of 2000.  The new transmitter is actually a pair of 1000 watt systems, designed to automatically back each other up, and notify technicians of a failure.  The technical staff of NWS can also dial into the system, evaluate it's operation, switch transmitters, and make adjustments from anywhere they have telephone access.  The transmitter used from 12/98 to 6/00 was a 'loaner' from Crown (at no additional cost to the project!) to provide service as quickly as possible, while technical details were resolved between Crown and NWS.

      The automated voice which is part of the Console Replacement System (CRS) has made it's debut on the Naples transmitter.  Used initially for only the station identification it is now being used for basic products, such as sunrise/sunset and tide times, hourly observations and the weekly test.  For more information see the link above in this paragraph.



 

    NOAA Weather Radio provides 24 hour a day, 7 day a week weather information over an area some 40 - 50 miles in diameter, including severe weather information such as severe thunderstorm or tornado watches and warnings. Using the new WRSAME (Weather Radio Specific Area Message Encoding) format, emergency information can be targeted to a specific county of concern. New consumer weather radio technology such as that offered by Radio Shack, Midland and Oregon Scientific in their SAME capable weather radios makes reliable, affordable weather warning available today. The companies also offer less sophisticated alert and non-alert radios at lower cost. Radio Shack's 2000 product line also includes SAME capability in scanners and CB radios.

    The State of Florida Division of Emergency Management has recently purchased one of the Radio Shack radios for every school in the State, under a special pricing agreement with the company. Collier County has purchased additional radios for public buildings such as libraries, parks, public safety buildings, and remotely located general County offices to help spread the word when severe weather threatens. By programming a simple code into the receiver, the consumer can limit the watches and warnings received to those issued for his/her county only.  In Collier County, the code is 0 1 2 0 2 1.  (In Hendry County use the code 0 1 2 0 5 1.) The receiver will ignore messages not addressed to that code, but will, depending upon the severity of the message, activate a beep or a siren to advise the resident that an urgent message has been received. The audio from the radio is then activated, delivering the message directly to the owner. The display also shows the type of statement in text, until the expiration time of the statement.

    You can also check this NOAA site for information on programming your new WRSAME capable radio!

    Until recently the closest transmitter to the Naples area was WXK83 operating on 162.475 MHz, located at the Lee County Emergency Operations Center in Ft. Myers, Florida, some 35 miles north of Naples. Programming is provided by the National Weather Service office in Ruskin, Florida, near Tampa. The 1000 watt (1 KW) transmitter provides coverage over much of northern Collier County, but does not reliably penetrate buildings beyond the northernmost end of the County.  WXK-83 still provides weather information for Lee County, but signal coverage over Collier was at best fair, and at worst, unusable. For that reason, a transmitter site in Collier County was developed.

    Collier County received a grant from the Florida Division of Emergency Management Competitive Grant program for the construction of a NOAA Weather Radio transmitter in the Naples area. This is a partnership project with the National Weather Service office in Miami, Florida which provides programming for the Naples transmitter.

    Under the partnership agreement, Collier County has used the grant funds to acquire and install equipment which meets the specifications of the National Weather Service, at a site acceptable to the NWS. Upon acceptable completion of the project, the Miami Weather Service office will assume ownership of the equipment, and provide the operational funding. Please keep in mind that some locations, particularly in reinforced concrete buildings, and/or at locations more than 30 miles from the transmitter may require outside antennas!


Getting a good signal in Collier County

    The signal from the new Naples transmitter is strong throughout the area from Immokalee, to Everglades City, to Naples and Marco Island! (We've added a map of Florida's NWR coverage at the bottom of the page.)  Seven channel receivers are REQUIRED, as the transmitter operates on one of the four new frequencies allocated to NWR. Throughout the area, receivers indoors should receive the signal very well on the built in antenna. However, NO radio system can provide 100% coverage everywhere, and some individual locations may not get as good a signal as neighbors nearby. In these rare cases, the following information will still apply!

    We're very happy to announce that the new NWR transmitter serving Collier County is now on the air!  The station is providing a much stronger signal over all of Collier County, and was placed in full service on December 11, 1998 at 11:00 a. m.   The warnings and other alert messages are now being received directly from the National Weather Service office in Miami which is responsible for warnings in Collier, Hendry, and Monroe Counties.

    Below are instructions to help you re-tune the Radio Shack 'SAME' capable radios to receive the new Naples station, on 162.525 megahertz: (For other makes and models of radios, please contact your dealer or your instruction manual.  You MUST have a seven channel NOAA Weather Radio to receive the signal properly!  Be sure the attached antenna is completely extended and vertical for best reception!)
 
 

Programming the Radio Shack SAME Capable Receivers
FOR RADIO SHACK'S MODEL 12-249 (WHITE) RADIO:

  Step 1: On the bottom of the radio is a switch, marked "SINGLE" and "MULTIPLE."  Set this switch to "SINGLE."  This limits the radio to ONE county alert code.  If you want to use multiple alert codes see your manual.

Step 2: Open the small door on top of the radio, just above the three buttons marked "off, weather, and alert."  This provides access to 12 buttons, marked 1-0, YES and NO.

Step 3: On the back, under the antenna, there is a small black switch marked "PROGRAM - OPERATE."  Move this switch to the "PROGRAM" setting.

Step 4: The display will alternately flash: "CH 4" and "162.475".   Now press the button marked "6" on top of the radio, then the button marked "YES".

Step 5: The display will then read "VOICE".  Press "YES" again.  (This causes the receiver to turn on the speaker automatically, allowing you to hear the voice message.)

Step 6: The display will then read "CONTINUO" and "BACKLIGHT".  Press "NO".  (This turns off the backlight after a few seconds, which lengthens the life of the backup battery if the power fails.)

Step 7: The display should then read "012021".  (This is the digital alert code for Collier County.)  If it does, press "YES", then set the black switch on the back to "OPERATE" and close the door on top of the radio.  Your re-programming is complete!

Step 8: If have a problem programming your radio please call Emergency Management at 774 8444, or send us an email with the details and your telephone number.  We will be happy to talk you through the installation of the correct SAME code.  This code tells the radio to only activate for alarms issued for Collier County.  In this way, you know to pay close attention whenever the radio activates! 

FOR RADIO SHACK'S MODEL 12-250 (CHARCOAL GRAY) RADIO:

Step 1: Open the small door on top of the radio, just below the three buttons marked "OFF, WEATHER and ALERT."  This provides access to 12 buttons, marked 1-0, YES and NO.

Step 2: On the back, under the antenna, there is a small black switch marked "PROGRAM - OPERATE."  Move this switch to the "PROGRAM" setting.

Step 3: The display will alternately flash a channel number and frequency, such as: "CH 1" and "162.400".   Now press the button marked "6" on top of the radio, then the button marked "YES".

Step 4: The display will then probably read "ALERT".  Press "NO".  It should now read "VOICE."  Press "YES." (This causes the receiver to turn on the speaker automatically, allowing you to hear the voice message.  When the end of message data bust is sent, the radio mutes automatically.)

Step 5: The display will then read "CONTINUO" and "BACKLIGHT".  Press "NO".  (This turns off the backlight after a few seconds, which lengthens the life of the backup battery if the power fails.)

Step 6: The display should say "SINGLE."  If so press "YES".   If it reads "MULTIPLE" press "NO" until it reads "SINGLE" then press "YES".  (This limits the radio to ONE county alert code.  If you want to use multiple alert codes see your manual.)

Step 7: The display should then flash "LOC 1" and "_ _ _ _ _ _ ".  Enter the code 0 1 2 0 2 1 (This is the digital alert code for Collier County.)  and press "YES".  The display will then show you sample watch and warning displays.  Set the black switch on the back to "OPERATE" and close the door on top of the radio.  Your programming is complete!

Step 8: If have a problem programming your radio please call Emergency Management at 774 8444, or send us an email with the details and your telephone number.  We will be happy to talk you through the installation of the correct SAME code.  This code tells the radio to only activate for alarms issued for Collier County.  In this way, you know to pay close attention whenever the radio activates!

    Normally, in stand by mode, the display should alternately flash between "WEATHER" and "ALRT ON."  If the latter reads "WEATHER ALRT OFF" press (and on the gray radio, HOLD) the ALERT button on the top of the radio, above the volume control.  The display must read "WEATHER ALRT ON" to receive warnings and alert you!

    It is possible, though unlikely, that there may be problems receiving the signal in some specific locations.  If you cannot hear the signal, please call or email the Emergency Management Department.  We'll be happy to work with you to solve the problem.  It's imperative, for the safety of your family, that you be able to receive this signal!

    When a watch or warning is received, a siren will sound, the display will indicate what the statement is, and a light will turn on below the display, indicating a statement, watch, or warning.  The light and display message will continue to display until the statement, watch or warning expires.  Remember: a WATCH means conditions favor the development of severe weather, and that it could happen during the duration of the watch.  A WARNING means it is occurring now, and immediate protective action should be taken.  (The 12-250 also shows the time remaining on each active statement.  If the display reads for example, 2H 56M, the statement is in effect for another 2 hours and 56 minutes.)

    Finally, the weather service in Miami will transmit a test alert each Wednesday between 11:00 a.m. and 12:30 p.m., unless severe weather is a possibility at that time.  When the test alert is received the radio will emit a "beep beep beep" sound, and the display will read "TEST."   The 12-250 will flash "WEEKLY"  "TEST" and the time remaining in the 15 minute test period.  If a test is not received within 7 days, the display will flash "CHECK OP."



    Receiving the new signal should not be difficult in most of the coverage area.  You should be able to receive it anywhere in your home, but if the signal is weak, the radio should be located where it receives the signal best, as indicated by a low background noise level. Extend the antenna fully, turn on the radio and turn up the volume so that you hear sound coming from the speaker. If you are on the correct frequency and there is no signal present, you should hear a "rushing" sound. Move the radio around your home until you receive the signal. You may hear it in some places, and not in others. Windows facing east (in the coastal Naples-Marco Island area, north from Everglades CIty and south from Immokalee) offer the best chance of receiving the signal indoors, unless they are covered by metal screens which block the signal.

    Once you find a spot where a clear signal is being received, mute the radio using the "Weather" or "Mute" button (if it is an alert model which sounds an alarm when an emergency message is received).  It will then monitor silently until it detects an emergency message. If your radio has no alert function, you will have to turn it on, turn up the sound, and monitor the audio for emergency messages.

    If you cannot find a place where the radio receives a good signal, you will have to add an outdoor antenna.

   Please check this page often for the latest developments in this project.


Florida NWR Network

For more information, contact:

COLLIER COUNTY EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
3301 East Tamiami Trail
Naples, Florida 34112
(239) 774-8444

Board of County Commissioners
Emergency Services Division
Collier County, Florida

Last updated 2 July 2002 by Rick Zyvoloski, RichardZyvoloski@colliergov.net
© 2002, Board of County Commissioners of Collier County, Florida



162.525 MHz, Naples/MIA162.550 MHz, Miami/MIA162.400 MHz, Key West/MIA162.475 MHz, West Palm Beach/MIA  162.400 MHz, Belle Glade/MIA162.475 MHz, Ft. Myers/TBW162.400 MHz/ Venice/TBW162.550 MHz, Tampa/TBW162.400 MHz, Inverness/TBW162.500 MHz, Sebring/TBW162.425 MHz, Port St. Lucie/MLB162.550 MHz, Melbourne/MLB162.475 MHz, Orlando/MLB162.400 MHz, Daytona Beach/MLB162.525 MHz, Ocala/JAX162.475 MHz, Gainesville/JAX162.425 MHz, Salem/TLH162.400 MHz, Tallahassee/TLH162.500 MHz, East Point/TLH162.550 MHz, Panama City/TLH162.400 MHz, Pensacola/MOB162.450 MHz, Bonifay/TLH